Dog-friendly beaches in Isle of Wight

ISLE OF WIGHT is a magnificent island off the south coast of England and enriched by its beautiful beaches.

The small patch of land, less than a mile from Hampshire at its closest to the mainland, welcomes millions of visitors every year including dogs – but where can they join their human families at the seaside?

Which Isle of Wight beaches can dogs go to?

  • Atherfield Bay, Ventnor
  • Bembridge Beach
  • Binnel Bay
  • Brightstone Bay
  • Brook Bay
  • Colwell Bay (dog restrictions from May to September) 
  • Compton Beach (dog restrictions from May to September away from area between Brook Chine and Hanover Point)
  • East Cowes Beach (dog restrictions from May to September)
  • Freshwater Bay (dog restrictions from May to September in the main part of the beach)
  • Gurnard Bay (dog restrictions from May to September)
  • Luccombe Bay
  • Monks Bay
  • Mount Bay
  • Norton Beach
  • Orchard Bay
  • Priory Beach
  • Reeth Bay
  • Rocken End Beach
  • Ryde Beach
  • Sandown Beach (dog restrictions from May to September)
  • Seagrove Bay
  • Seaview Bay (dog restrictions from May to September)
  • Shanklin Beach (dog restrictions from May to September)
  • Shepherd’s Chine
  • Steephill Cove Beach (dogs must be on leads until 6pm)
  • St Helens Beach
  • Thorness Bay Beach (dog restrictions apply – check information board)
  • Totland Bay (dog restrictions from May to September)
  • Ventnor Beach (dog restrictions from May to September)
  • Watcombe Bay
  • Whale Chine, Chale
  • Whitecliff Bay
  • Yaverland Beach, Sandown
Sandown Beach is one of more than 30 seaside hotspots that welcome dogs on the Isle of Wight (Ronald Saunders/Flickr)
Sandown Beach is one of more than 30 seaside hotspots that welcome dogs on the Isle of Wight (Ronald Saunders/Flickr)

Why are dogs banned from going onto beaches?

The main reason for not allowing dogs on to beaches at certain times is for health and safety purposes.

Although most owners will clean up after their pets when they are out, some fail to pick up their dog’s poo. 

Due to a dog’s diet being largely meat-based, leaving their faeces on the beach runs the risk of humans contracting toxocariasis – or zoonosis. 

And during the busy months, this becomes even more dangerous – especially for children – with potential problems including blindness and breathing difficulties.

Things to consider when taking your dog to the beach

Dogs love a nice trip to the seaside, just like their human companions. 

But there are a number of rules and tips to consider when heading to the beach.

These include: 

  • Check with beach management to see if dogs are allowed
  • Take poo bags to clear up their mess
  • Bring a lead – dogs have to be on a leash on some beaches at all times
  • Avoid the big crowds
  • Consider some people may not like dogs
  • Take plenty of fresh water and a bowl for your dog
  • Take a first aid kit in case your dog becomes injured
  • Check for local vets in case of emergency
  • Make sure your dog is wearing their collar and ID tag
  • If they are wear a GPS tracker, make sure it is fully charged
  • Take spare towels to dry them
  • Keep an eye on your dog at all times

Hampshire is not the only county with countless coastal hubs that welcome pooches with England having dog-friendly beaches from Land’s End to Druridge Bay.

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