Dog-friendly beaches in Tyne and Wear

TYNE and Wear in the north of England is not normally an area that is associated with people going to the beach, largely due to its colder climate.

With temperatures hitting as low as -8°C during the winter, many would imagine heading to the seaside is the last thing people would do – but not for dogs who can enjoy getting sand in between their paws all year round.

Which Tyne and Wear beaches can dogs go to?

  • Cullercoats Beach, Tynemouth (dog restrictions from May to September)
  • Hendon Beach, Sunderland 
  • King Edwards Bay, Tynemouth (dog restrictions from May to September)
  • Long Sands Beach, Tynemouth (dog restrictions on the south part from May to September)
  • Marsden Beach, South Shields
  • Roker Beach, Sunderland (dog restrictions from the pier to the slipway from May to September)
  • Ryhope Beach, Sunderland
  • Sandhaven Beach, South Shields (dog restrictions from May to September)
  • Seaburn Beach, Sunderland (dog restrictions from opposite Morrison’s supermarket to steps opposite the Whitburn Road-Dykelands Road junction from May to September)
  • Whitburn Beach, Sunderland
  • Whitley Bay Beach (dog restrictions on the south part from May to September)
Marsden Beach in South Shields is just one of many glorious beaches that welcome dogs all year round
Marsden Beach in South Shields is just one of many glorious beaches that welcome dogs all year round

Why are dogs banned from going to some beaches in Tyne and Wear?

Despite the cold climes, Tyne and Wear continues to be a haven for local residents and tourists alike to take their dogs to the coast.

Yet, heavy restrictions are placed on many beaches across the area with some even banning dogs entirely.

Although this may seem cruel to the pooches, the main reasons are for health and safety purposes.

When visiting the beach, dogs will likely need to wee and poo while there.

This can cause serious health issues if it is not cleaned up properly, particularly for children, as a canine’s diet means their faeces can lead to humans contracting toxcariasis – or zoonosis.

Among the symptoms for this is blindness and breathing difficulties.

Meanwhile, some beaches are privately-owned and therefore it is down to the owner as to whether they want dogs to step foot of their slice of the coast.

Things to consider when taking your dog to the beach

Dogs love a nice trip to the seaside, just like their human companions. 

But there are a number of rules and tips to consider when heading to the beach.

These include: 

  • Check with beach management to see if dogs are allowed
  • Take poo bags to clear up their mess
  • Bring a lead – dogs have to be on a leash on some beaches at all times
  • Avoid the big crowds
  • Consider some people may not like dogs
  • Take plenty of fresh water and a bowl for your dog
  • Take a first aid kit in case your dog becomes injured
  • Check for local vets in case of emergency
  • Make sure your dog is wearing their collar and ID tag
  • If they are wear a GPS tracker, make sure it is fully charged
  • Take spare towels to dry them
  • Keep an eye on your dog at all times

Tyne and Wear are not the only places with countless coastal hubs that welcome pooches with England having dog-friendly beaches from Land’s End to Druridge Bay.